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Puffin Bokeh

A puffin flies past Longstone lighthouse on the Farne Islands, Northumberland, England.

In general when shooting seabirds in flight I would aim to have the sky as the background. This is simply because the autofocus tracking can easily see the land and loose the bird. However, sometimes you can keep your target in focus and then have a far more interesting background. In this one-of-a-kind image, the 400 mm focal length has turned the hundreds of guillemots and puffins nesting and flying in the background to appear as soft bokeh bubbles.

The Longstone lighthouse, 1 mile away, is famous for the daring rescue of survivors of the Forfarshire steamer shipwreck by the Lighthouse Keeper and his daughter, William and Grace Darling, in 1838. Grace, only 23 at the time, spotted survivors on the rocks from her bedroom window when she woke in the morning. The seas were too rough to launch a lifeboat from the mainland, so she and her father made their rescues using their rowing boat. Sadly, Grace Darling died of tuberculosis in October 1842, aged just 26.

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Filename
Puffin Bokeh.jpg
Copyright
© 2016, Adam West, All Rights Reserved
Image Size
5419x3048 / 3.7MB
Contained in galleries
England - Northumberland, Nature
A puffin flies past Longstone lighthouse on the Farne Islands, Northumberland, England. <br />
<br />
In general when shooting seabirds in flight I would aim to have the sky as the background. This is simply because the autofocus tracking can easily see the land and loose the bird. However, sometimes you can keep your target in focus and then have a far more interesting background. In this one-of-a-kind image, the 400 mm focal length has turned the hundreds of guillemots and puffins nesting and flying in the background to appear as soft bokeh bubbles. <br />
<br />
The Longstone lighthouse, 1 mile away, is famous for the daring rescue of survivors of the Forfarshire steamer shipwreck by the Lighthouse Keeper and his daughter, William and Grace Darling, in 1838. Grace, only 23 at the time, spotted survivors on the rocks from her bedroom window when she woke in the morning. The seas were too rough to launch a lifeboat from the mainland, so she and her father made their rescues using their rowing boat. Sadly,  Grace Darling died of tuberculosis in October 1842, aged just 26.