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As One Journey Ends, Another Begins

Portencross Pier, Ayrshire coast, Scotland.

Described as being only the second concrete pier in the world, it is thought to be about 120 years old. The pier was established to transport locally grown produce such as potatoes to Glasgow by paddle steamer in the days before the railways. Glasgow was overflowing with industry, shipping and migrants as the second city of what was the British Empire at the time.

In addition to being over-engineered, the pier has a removable section to allow the winter storm breakers to pass through without damaging the structure. The wooden boards that filled the section are long gone, replaced by heavy iron plates. These may lead to the demise of the structure, but the breakers have lifted the central plate off its bolts already.

The pier is popular with photographers due to its T-shape the backdrop of the Isle of Arran across the Firth of Clyde. Sadly, one local photographer fell through the gap onto the rocks before it was covered a few years ago.

I decided on avoiding the sunset shots and went for the lovely rusty plates against the deep blue waters as it is such a nice colour combination.

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Filename
As One Journey Ends, Another Begins
Copyright
© 2016, Adam West, All Rights Reserved
Image Size
5331x3332 / 13.1MB
Contained in galleries
Scotland - Arran
Portencross Pier, Ayrshire coast, Scotland. <br />
<br />
Described as being only the second concrete pier in the world, it is thought to be about 120 years old. The pier was established to transport locally grown produce such as potatoes to Glasgow by paddle steamer in the days before the railways. Glasgow was overflowing with industry, shipping and migrants as the second city of what was the British Empire at the time. <br />
<br />
In addition to being over-engineered, the pier has a removable section to allow the winter storm breakers to pass through without damaging the structure. The wooden boards that filled the section are long gone, replaced by heavy iron plates. These may lead to the demise of the structure, but the breakers have lifted the central plate off its bolts already.<br />
<br />
The pier is popular with photographers due to its T-shape the backdrop of the Isle of Arran across the Firth of Clyde. Sadly, one local photographer fell through the gap onto the rocks before it was covered a few years ago. <br />
<br />
I decided on avoiding the sunset shots and went for the lovely rusty plates against the deep blue waters as it is such a nice colour combination.