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A General's Retreat

The ruins of Newark Castle sit atop a stunning clifftop location on the East coast of Scotland. Originally called St Monans, the castle was established in the mid 1200s and was the childhood home of the Scottish king Alexander III. Alexander was the first to unify Scotland as we know it today after protracted battles and negotiations with the pesky Norwiegens. In 1649 the castle and estates were sold to David Leslie, a highly successful General in the Scottish Covenanter Army during the wars that ravaged Scotland, Ireland and England during the middle decades of the 1600s. Leslie restored Newark after spending nine years in the Tower of London, turning it into a five storey Renaissance mansion whose remains are still visible today. 18th and 19th century alterations for internal comfort lead to a collapse of the main tower and cliff erosion consumed the west range. In 1898, the rich Glasgow shipping merchant William Burrell considered rebuilding Newark Castle to house his enormous collection of art. He was unable to persuade the owner at the time and his great collection was donated to the city of Glasgow.

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Filename
A General's Retreat
Copyright
© 2016, Adam West, All Rights Reserved
Image Size
4505x2816 / 11.4MB
Contained in galleries
Scotland - Fife
The ruins of Newark Castle sit atop a stunning clifftop location on the East coast of Scotland. Originally called St Monans, the castle was established in the mid 1200s and was the childhood home of the Scottish king Alexander III. Alexander was the first to unify Scotland as we know it today after protracted battles and negotiations with the pesky Norwiegens. In 1649 the castle and estates were sold to David Leslie, a highly successful General in the Scottish Covenanter Army during the wars that ravaged Scotland, Ireland and England during the middle decades of the 1600s. Leslie restored Newark after spending nine years in the Tower of London, turning it into a five storey Renaissance mansion whose remains are still visible today. 18th and 19th century alterations for internal comfort lead to a collapse of the main tower and cliff erosion consumed the west range. In 1898, the rich Glasgow shipping merchant William Burrell considered rebuilding Newark Castle to house his enormous collection of art. He was unable to persuade the owner at the time and his great collection was donated to the city of Glasgow.